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Dear Tacoma Project Collection

  • CAC0001
  • 2020 - 2021

Dear Tacoma was a cooperative project undertaken by the Tacoma Public Library's Northwest Room and Grit City Magazine to collect local stories about living during the COVID-19 pandemic. Launched in May 2020, the collection consists of documents such as audio recordings, emails, photographs, and other content submitted by the general public to the library.

Tacoma Public Library

Paul Jackson Digital Videos

  • CAC1001

Born digital videos created by Tacoma-based filmmaker Paul Jackson, PhD including documentaries, interviews, and recordings of regional meetings and events.

Paul Jackson

Tacoma Community House Oral History Interviews

  • CAC2001

Tacoma Community House offers services to many immigrant and refugee populations in the Puget Sound area. These oral history interviews contribute to Tacoma’s current historical record and provide insight into the lives of underrepresented immigrant and refugee groups. These personal stories allow us to learn about their contexts, viewpoints and experiences.

Franklin Pierce High School Ethnic Studies Interviews

  • CAC4001

Includes interviews conducted by Franklin Pierce High School students for an Ethnic Studies class with teacher Dan Call. Students interviewed family, friends, and other community members about race, racial identity, microaggressions, and discrimination. Interview transcripts created by students have been produced for some audio recordings.

Black Lives Matter Mural Project

  • CAC3002

Includes oral histories, digital images, and event flyers related to the creation of a Black Lives Matter mural created in Tollefson plaza in 2022. The mural was created by artists Dionne Bonner, Kenya Adams, Gwen Jones, Charles Taylor and Breeze.

Radio Tacoma Programs

  • CAC2003

Radio Tacoma (101.9) is an all-volunteer, low-power FM community radio station with a mission "to serve Tacoma and the surrounding area, providing the opportunity for participatory democracy as a venue for local voices, news, and talent that might otherwise not get heard." Their regular programming includes The Cannabis Corner, Climate Talk, and Grit City Stories.

Community Event Collection

  • CAC0003

Includes videos, interviews, and other material gathered by the Community Archives Center at community events.

Charles Carson (C. C. Dove) Papers

  • CAC1002

Includes writings, photographs, flyers, and other information related to Charles Carson's work as a speaker, musician, and activist.

Charles Carson

Justi Pfutzenreuter Salishan Research Files

  • CAC1003

Includes research files and notes gathered and compiled by Pfutzenreuter related to the Salishan neighborhood. Also included is Justi's "Narratives of Salishan: The Untold Story," a documentary she produced for her Masters Capstone Project in Spring 2019 as part of the University of Washington Tacoma's Masters of Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies program.

The documentary introduction states, "When it comes to Salishan, most of the history that we do know lies in short, unnuanced articles in the Tacoma News Tribune. These articles were, and continue to be, influential in the ways readers view the neighborhood and those who live in it. Written by outsiders who may have preconceived notions, these articles leave no space for residents’ voices and their experiences. Taking this into consideration, the history that we don’t know resides in the minds and memories of those who have lived there, including families that belong to the Puyallup Tribe from whom the land was originally taken. It’s important to examine these perspectives to develop a fuller picture of the neighborhood. Since its origins in 1943, Salishan has had a negative reputation within the larger community. Without the voices of the tenants, negative stereotypes about Salishan will persist. We should ask, 'who’s telling the story?' and 'who’s constructing the narrative of Salishan?' This film project documents the experiences of residents, using their own voices, as an intervention into the dominant negative narrative about Salishan."