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RSO-40

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Marching forward, arm in arm with their fellow young Americans are girls of the Tacoma and Puyallup valley JACL, a substantial part of the national Nisei soldiers and white boys of the same companies, at the wind-up of the grand march as they danced in Tacoma's Odd Fellows Hall. Americans all -- and no doubt of it -- were the young people in the throng pictured. the cameraman caught them as they closed the grand march Wednesday night at the Odd Fellows hall where Tacoma and Puyallup Valley American-born Japanese entertained their fellow "Nisei" who are serving in Uncle Sam's army. Both Nisei boys and soldiers of other complexions mixed enthusiastically at dinner, and the dance which followed it were equally popular with girls of the Japanese American Citizens League. Tacoma and Valley chapters of the JACL, aided by their parents, demonstrated their hospitality to the boys at Camp Murray and Fort Lewis as their part in the city's national defense week.


Overhead Shot of the members of the Puyallup Valley Japanese Americans Club arm in arms with Caucasian soldiers in an auditorium as the Brad Banner band plays on stage.

RSO-41

Overhead Shot of the members of the Puyallup Valley Japanese Americans Club arm in arms with Caucasian soldiers in an auditorium as the Brad Banner band plays on stage at the Odd Fellows Club.

RSO-42

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With lusty American voices Nisei and friends join in singing "God Bless America" at the close of the dinner.


Members of the Puyallup Valley Japanese Americans Club and soldiers singing at the Odd Fellows Club.

HBS-006

On October 22, 1945, this group of unidentified individuals were photographed seated around a table after what appears to be a dinner at the USO #2, 713-15 Commerce St. (photograph by F.L. Powell of Tacoma)

HBS-031

Undated photograph of the Matrons Club. The woman seated front left is Helen Beck Stafford, one of the founders of the group. Dr. Stafford moved to Tacoma in 1926 to marry Wendell P. Stafford on New Years Eve. Even though she had taught for a few years in Kansas schools, Tacoma school personnel directors refused to hire a black teacher. She stayed at home and cared for her husband and daughter. She and several other women who stayed home to rear their children would get together for a social outlet. In 1927, they formally organized the Matrons Club. The women who attended the meetings often brought their children along and the children would play together. (TNT 2/22/1982- NWR clipping file) (photograph by Liberal Engraving Co., 907 1/2 Commerce)

HBS-028

This undated photograph was taken in front of the snack bar at the USO No. 2 in Tacoma. At the head of the table was Arthur Hayes and at the end closest to the camera was Helen B. Stafford, local civic activist. USO No. 2 opened at 713 Commerce Street in September 1942 to serve Tacoma's African American servicemen and closed in March 1947. This location also served servicemen during World War I as the Army-Navy Club.

Korean-Americans - 2

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Yon H. Hecker fed lunch to her sister's children in the tent outside the plant of Path Enterprises during the continued labor problems Tuesday. Both Mrs. Hecker and her sister work at the plant. The boys are 8-year-old Joseph Campbell (in center) and 5-year-old Jim Campbell, (on right).
Kellman Photo

Korean-Americans - 7

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Peter Kim drinks his Sake while talking with James Jee (L) and his sister Joanne Jee (R). The three are from Vancouver B.C. and think the Torch Light is one of the best Korean nightclubs in the northwest.
Story by Dorian Smith
Photo by Bill Hunter

Last Chance Shelter - 2

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Bill Garst of Tacoma reads on his bunk in the Last Chance Shelter. He lost his job and is looking for another one. He doesn't get unemployment (reason unknown) and because he couldn't make house payments foreclosure forced him out onto the street.
Photo by Peter Haley

Nativity House Charity - 1

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Peter Garcia enjoys a bowl of turkey noodle soup Friday during the lunch time meal at the Nativity House at 1517 Commerce in Tacoma. Two meals a day are served free of charge to the needy. City officials are concerned with possible drug activity in the neighborhood.
Bruce Kellman with Mike Gilbert/story

Nativity House Charity - 4

"Staff member Kevin Coley hugged a drop-in at Nativity House, a Commerce Street haven for the homeless." The Liberty Project revitalizing downtown Tacoma's Lower Pacific will most likely scatter the homeless population. However, according to people and organizations who work with rehabilitating people, it will not end the homelessness issue. It was suggested that the plan involve housing and training for the disadvantaged.


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Nativity House Worker & "Drop-In"
Larson

Indians, Nisqually - 2

Tepees and tents of 300 Native Americans were set up in a field in Washington D.C. The camp had been setup following a transcontinental motor trip called the Trial of Self-Determination. Sid Mills, a Nisqually tribal member said in an interview in D.C. that they were there to secure a future for Native Americans because currently there is none.


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Indians, Nisqually

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