Showing 52 results

Collections
Puyallup Tribe Image
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

52 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Members of Puyallup Tribe playing game on shores of Puget Sound

In this photograph believed to be from the mid 1880s, a group of Puyallup Indians gathers on the shore of the Puget Sound to gamble. The game they are playing appears to be the bone game, where two teams of 10-12 sit opposite each other. One team has four bones which they pass to the distracting accompaniment of the pounding of sticks and singing of chants. The other team must guess who has the bones. In the background are longboats and a bridge. The Puyallup village during this time period was believed to be at the foot of South 15th St. KING-003, TPL 2897.

Indians, Puyallup--Government and Politics - 1

Back of Photo:
Puyallup Tribal members (L-R) Misty Stafford, Dianne Ward, Nancy Shippentower, Kathy Lopez, Barbara Richards, Jenny Williams and Maggie Bostrom wait outside the Elders Building for the results of an election to fill three vacant seats on the tribal council.
News/Martin
Bill Hunter Photo

Indians, Puyallup (History) - 1

Back of Photo:
Yesteryear Feb. 7, 1986
Puyallup Indian Tribe members gathered on Feb. 9, 1891, as part of their monthly neighborhood meetings. This was the time when Indian families gathered to discuss the business of running the reservation and making improvements in the quality of life. The women were not generally included in business affairs of the tribe, which would explain their absence in the photograph.
State of Washington Views
Rutter, Photo
Tacoma, Wash.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 1

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


Confrontation between Puyallup tribal members and police about fishing rights guaranteed in the Medicine Creek Treaty (1854) resulted in a riot police unit being brought in to disperse the fishing camp. Shots were fired and tear gas was used. Photo taken by Tribune staff member Warren Anderson.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 2

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


A Native American girl was arrested along with forty other indigenous people during a second confrontation with police following a fire on a railroad bridge near a Puyallup Tribal fishing camp. The fire started after police and state officers raided the fishing camp earlier that morning, arresting twenty people. Police later returned to the camp with fire units and arrested everyone at the fishing camp. The camp was established by Puyallup tribal members to advocate for fishing rights and indigenous people from across the United States joined their protest. Picture taken by Tribune staff member Wayne Zimmerman.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 3

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


Confrontation between Puyallup tribal members and police about fishing rights guaranteed in the Medicine Creek Treaty (1854) resulted in a riot police unit being brought in to disperse the fishing camp. Shots were fired and tear gas was used. Two officers stand behind a truck as people look on in the background, including a person filming using a movie camera. Photo taken by Tribune staff member Warren Anderson.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 4

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


U.S. District Court Judge Walter T. McGovern signed a temporary injunction citing a federal statute that prohibits liquor sales on tribal lands unless under a tribal liquor code. Judge McGovern stated that because the Puyallup Tribe does not have a liquor code it was illegal to sell liquor there. Some establishments continued to sell alcohol throughout the day. The image is of the Indian Trading Post located on Puyallup Tribal land and owned by Robert Satiacum and Victoria Satiacum.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 6

Back of Photo:
Three-year-old Calvin Medina, Tacoma, checks out his competition and other tribal dress during the Puyallup tribe's Pow Wow. There was singing, dancing, eating, and competition for best dress and dance.
Photo by David Brandt

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 7

Back of Photo:
Artist rendering of Puyallup Tribal Bingo Hall


A year after the Puyallup Tribe reached a $162 million settlement which guaranteed hundreds of new jobs, social services, and economic rebirth programs began to receive funding. “Among the tribe’s projects for economic improvement is a $2.1 million state-of-the-art bingo hall, seating up to 1,500 people, to be built in east Tacoma.” The bingo hall was estimated to generate between 90 to 150 jobs.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 9

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


Employees of the Puyallup tribe’s fish hatchery released young trout into a tributary of the Puyallup river leading the trout to the Puget Sound and eventually the Pacific Ocean. The trout were around a year old and had been raised by the Puyallup Tribe at the tribal hatchery on Pioneer Way West. The Puyallup Tribe obtained the trout from the Quinault Tribe and the fish are the Quinault River steelhead. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 11

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup
Photo by Bob Rudsit


Police and state revenue agents seized cartons of unstamped cigarettes and other Tabacco products allegedly headed for the Satiacum Smoke Shop. The raid was based on a state law prohibiting unlicensed distributors from handling unstamped cigarettes. Puyallup Tribal member Robert Satiacum was not a licensed dealer according to Robert Munzinger, who served as assistant director of field operations for the Revenue Department. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 12

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


Joe Washington, shaman of the Lummis, led the Puyallup Tribe in a ceremony marking the start of the salmon run. The ancient ceremony was held on tribal land near the Portland Avenue Bridge. The ceremony ended with a wedding. Joe Washington asked for the tribe’s adults to remember what they had seen and to pass the knowledge on to their children. Photo by Tribune staff member Russ Carmack.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 13

Back of Photo:
Indians, Puyallup


“Members of the Puyallup Tribe celebrate Yekabotsa Mills’ ninth birthday with a Native American Church prayer ceremony.” A tepee is backlit, showing the people sitting inside. Photo by New Tribune staff Dean J Koepfler

Results 1 to 20 of 52