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Richards Studio Photographs Industries -- Smelting/Refining Image With digital objects
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873-12

American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO), Tacoma. Worker directing activity of a large crane constructed over railroad tracks at the edge of Commencement Bay. Ships were loaded and unloaded at this point. The mechanical crane could carry 5 tons of ore on each dip into the hold. For J. Gius, reporter.


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1930-1940; Copper industry--Tacoma--1930-1940; Industrial facilities--Tacoma;

873-15

American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO), Tacoma. Arrival of a European ship delivering ore from Russian mines to the smelter. Close-up view of ship with workers and rigging at smelter dock. To the left can be seen the outline of the giant mechanical crane used to unload the ships. At this time, Russian lacked the technology and infrastructure to process the ore themselves. In 1934, Russia produced 15.6% of the world's gold. Russian production was second only to Africa.


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1930-1940; Copper industry--Tacoma--1930-1940; Industrial facilities--Tacoma;

873-18

In January of 1935, 9,600 tons of gold bearing ore were removed from the holds of the Soviet freighter "Brandon" by huge iron buckets at the ASARCO refinery in Ruston. In 1935, The Soviet Union did not have a large enough smelter of its own to process the tons of ore being extracted from its mines. The "Brandon" had come from Leningrad. The American Smelting & Refining Company expected to receive 100,000 tons of gold rich ore from The Soviet Union in 1935. Mr. S. Raiz, a representative of the Soviets, was sent to Tacoma to keep a close eye on the process - and the gold. Photograph ordered by the American Smelting & Refining Co. (ASARCO) (TNT 1-15-35, p. 1-article; TNT 1-23-35, p. 1-article) TPL-807


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1930-1940; Copper industry--Tacoma--1930-1940; Industrial facilities--Tacoma;

873-9

American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO), Tacoma. Worker, with foot in trough, working under steel beams at glowing industrial oven. For J. Gius, reporter.


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1930-1940; Copper industry--Tacoma--1930-1940; Industrial facilities--Tacoma;

D11798-3

Views of Atlas Foundry and Machine Company. The foundry was established in 1899.


Atlas Foundry & Machine Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Aerial photographs;

D11798-7

This aerial view of the Atlas Foundry and Machine Company (now Atlas Casting and Technology) at 3012 So. Wilkeson St. dates from July 1941. The Atlas building, near the center, is located between Center Street (at the left) and So. Tacoma Way. I-5 has yet to be built on the ridge of open land at the far right. [Also dated 08-26-1941]


Atlas Foundry & Machine Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Aerial photographs;

A17824-2

Pictures of assembly line at Nelson Boiler for Pacific Iron & Steel. Nelson Boiler Co. strengthened the company by consolidating with the iron and steel industry. They relocated into expanded facilities in order to fill Navy orders for steel barges. The new facilities enabled the company to keep Navy barges covered during building process. Interior view of covered plant.


Steel industry--Tacoma; Defense industry--Tacoma; World War, 1939-1945--Economic & industrial aspects--Tacoma; Nelson Boiler Co. (Tacoma);

A14005-1

Long view of the exterior of Pacific Iron and Steel Works at 1602 Canal St. (now Portland Ave.) The company manufactured heavy machinery for logging, hoisting and dredging. The foundry was built in 1914.


Pacific Iron & Steel Works (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Steel industry--Tacoma-- 1940-1950;

A14005-6

Pacific Iron & Steel Works, 1602 Canal St. (now Portland Ave.) An employee looks diminutive beside what may be a huge mold for steel castings.The foundry, built in 1914, also manufactured large machinery for logging and hoisting.


Pacific Iron & Steel Works (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Steel industry--Tacoma-- 1940-1950;

A14005-8

Pacific Iron & Steel Works, 1602 Canal St. (now Portland Ave.) An employee turns a wheel operating a large piece of machinery in the foundry.


Pacific Iron & Steel Works (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Steel industry--Tacoma-- 1940-1950;

A14005-7

Foundry operations - Pacific Iron & Steel Works. Pacific Iron & Steel was housed in a two-story wood & sheet metal structure at 1602 Canal St. (now Portland Ave.) The company, founded in 1914, manufactured logging and hoisting machinery, steel castings and dredging machinery. A worker is pictured here on January 10, 1943, turning the wheel which operates the large machine before him.


Pacific Iron & Steel Works (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Steel industry--Tacoma--1940-1950;

D76310-1

This aerial view of Tacoma shows the American Smelting & Refining Company's (ASARCO) smoke stack, plant and the surrounding area as it looked in July of 1953. The ASARCO smoke stack was a dominant feature in the Tacoma skyline from its construction in 1917 to its implosion in 1993. The plant stood near Point Defiance. Here large vessels can be seen pulled up to the dock to be loaded with metals to be shipped throughout the world. To the left can be seen part of the marina of the Tacoma Yacht Club and to the lower right, the city of Ruston. TPL-8483


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1950-1960; Copper industry--Tacoma--1950-1960;

D76413-20

Aerial of Bethlehem Steel, Seattle. Located on a tract of 45 acres along West Spokane Stree, just west of Duwamish Waterway, the Seattle plant is a compact and highly efficient steelmaking unit. When operating at full capacity, the plant has a work force of about 1450. They represent a broad spectrum of skills and trades needed in the manufacture of steel.


Steel industry; Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corp. (Seattle); Aerial photographs; Factories--Seattle;

D155703-6

Scenes from the steel industry. Star Iron & Steel Co. of Tacoma was in the process of manufacturing winch components for Everett Alumina Crane in the early part of February, 1969. Work was being done primarily in building 532. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co.


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1960-1970; Hoisting machinery;

D157214-19

Scenes from Fick Foundry. A Fick Foundry employee is pictured on October 16, 1969, in a workshop area of the foundry. What appears to be a giant propeller lies on a long rectangular work table before him. Fick Foundry had long been established at 1005 East D St. and were manufacturers of metal castings for machine, marine and general use. Photograph ordered by Winston Fournier & Associates, Dallas.


Fick Foundry Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1960-1970;

D138073-9

Exterior - Star Iron & Steel. Star Iron & Steel Co. would move into new quarters in the Port Industrial area in 1963. Bldg. 407 shown above in this April 9, 1963, photograph, held the company's offices, which were in a separate building from the large plant. Owned by Edward N. Allen, Star Iron was one of the oldest steel fabricating companies in the Pacific Northwest. They specialized in building cranes, hoists, towers, and equipment for the lumber industry. During WWII, they made some of the heaviest and largest cranes for the U.S. Navy. Photograph ordered by Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel. (TNT 7-24-63, A-11)


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1960-1970; Facades--Tacoma--1960-1970; Signs (Notices);

A139357-2

Interior of new Star Iron & Steel Co. plant on Alexander Avenue. Richards Studio notes indicate these are "fixed wheel gates" in process of being assembled. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co.


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1960-1970;

A139670-5

Additional view of Star Iron & Steel Co.'s "Porta Tower" in operation at the Cotten Bros. logging site located in Packwood. These towers could be moved from logging camps to other logging camps with relative ease with transport by heavy-duty trucks. "Porta Towers" were mobile steel spur trees. See A139670-4 for another view of "Porta Tower" in use. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co.


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel; Hoisting machinery; Logs;

D157214-49

Scenes from Fick Foundry. An unidentified worker at Fick Foundry, 1005 East D St., is pictured on October 16, 1969, one-handedly stirring a metal container of boiling liquid hung from a winch. Masses of steam obscure the contents. Drops of the molten metal escape the container and some appear to land on or near the worker. Photograph ordered by Winston Fournier & Associates, Dallas.


Fick Foundry Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1960-1970; Founding--Tacoma--1960-1970; Hoisting machinery;

D157214-94

1969 Scenes from Fick Foundry. A shimmering cascade of sparks streams from a machine used in Fick Foundry's operations. The unidentified foundry employee grips the metal tongs of the machine while wearing heavy gloves and protective goggles. Fick Foundry was established by Samuel Fick in the early 1920's and with his two sons' help, primarily produced iron manhole rings and covers and window sash weights. The company would grow and eventually move to manufacture high-integrity castings to meet modern technology's demands. Photograph ordered by Winston Fournier & Associates, Dallas. (Morgan: South on the Sound, p. 176)


Fick Foundry Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1960-1970; Metalworking--Tacoma;

D153667-1

On a wet and bleak day in March, 1968, Star Iron & Steel Co. employees tested a new 100-ton gantry crane meant for dam work. The men are dwarfed by the sheer size of the crane located outside of company headquarters at 326 Alexander Ave. in the Tideflats. The heavy crane, standing 64 feet high, actually weighs in at 125 tons. It was built for the Army Corps of Engineers to handle powerhouse intake and spillway gates on the Little Goose Lock & Dam on Snake River. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co. (TNT 3-17-68, C-21)


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Hoisting machinery; Steel industry--Tacoma--1960-1970;

D162621-3

Henry M. Botnen of Star Iron & Steel Company examines a large hoist drum being manufactured for the royal government of Afghanistan in October of 1972. The drum has been placed in a lath and is undergoing truing. Star Iron & Steel, located at 326 Alexander Avenue on Tacoma's tideflats, was a decades-old company whose work involved steel fabrication and heavy crane manufacture. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co. (Additional identification provided by a reader)


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1970-1980; Botnen, Henry;

D162075-1

This Hardhat Saved A Life Studio set up of hard hat tilted against a 20.1 lb. piece of steel. An arrow points to the damage incurred on the hard hat, presumably by the 20.1 lb. of steel which impacted it. It looks like Star Iron & Steel Co. employee Ed Sweet's life was saved by the use of safety equipment - in this case, a hard hat - which withstood the weight and force of the steel. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel Co.


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1970-1980; Safety equipment;

D160916-1

Gate hoist. The above gate hoist was built for use on the Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, by Star Iron & Steel Co. of Tacoma. Hoist is shown on September 16, 1971, prior to shipment. Star Iron & Steel had contracts of about $14 million for 1971. The firm would be sold late in September to Breeze Corporations, Inc. of New Jersey. Star Iron & Steel would be a wholly owned subsidiary of Breeze and continue to operate under present management. Photograph ordered by Star Iron & Steel. (TNT 9-22-71, D-14 - article on sale to Breeze)


Star Iron & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Steel industry--Tacoma--1970-1980; Hoisting machinery;

A24937-3

Ace Furnace and Steel Company. Exterior of the plant facilities. Ace Furnace and Steel Company manufactured furnaces, steel tanks, gasoline tankers and trailers, prefabricated service stations, and subcontracted on boats including interior work, ventilating ducts, galleys, etc. They also handled sheet metal work and blower and ventilating systems. (T.Times, 9/4/1946)


Ace Furnace & Steel Co. (Tacoma); Heating & ventilation industry--Tacoma--1940-1950; Buildings--Tacoma--1940-1950;

D31817-13

Girls from Catholic College visiting Permanente plant, Bill Gorman. Students watch while molten alumina is siphoned from a reduction cell into a large crucible at the Permanente plant. Tacoma Catholic College had purchased the former Weyerhaeuser mansion, Haddaway Hall at 4301 No. Stevens St., and converted it into a Junior College for Women.


Permanente Metals Corp. (Tacoma); Aluminum industry--Tacoma--1940-1950; Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Laborers--Tacoma--1940-1950; Students--Tacoma--1940-1950;

D32027-4

Tacoma Smelter for Industrial Page, Times, George Beckingham. This was called the anode where molten copper was poured into molds. Each copper ingot was 500 pounds and had to be jacked out by hand and picked up by a crane. The crane had to be attached manually and then guided to a cooling rack. The crew doing that also helped to purify the molten copper before it was poured by shoving logs into the melting pot to oxidize the impurities. Built and established as the Ryan Smelter by Dennis Ryan in 1887, the smelter was sold to William R. Rust in 1889, who changed the name to the Tacoma Smelting and Refining Company. It was sold again in 1905 to the American Smelting & Refining Company (ASARCO). Originally built to produce lead, by 1911 the smelter became a major supplier of copper and lead was no longer produced. The company smelted gold and silver and refined electrolytic copper and arsenic. (T.Times, 2/26/1948, p.35) (Additional information provided by a reader)


American Smelting & Refining Co. (Tacoma); Smelters--Tacoma--1940-1950; Copper industry--Tacoma--1940-1950; Industrial facilities--Tacoma;

D29448-11

Permanente Metals, Mr. Love. Olin opened a plant at this location September 1942. In December 1946 the company was sold to Kaiser Aluminum who operated Permanente Metals. The Tacoma plant had its own aluminum reduction plant. Permanente produced "pig" aluminum that was transported to Kaiser plants in Trentwood, near Spokane, to be made into specific grades of aluminum by the addition of other metallic elements such as copper, zinc, silicon, magnesium, manganese, etc. Soda ash from California and alumina from Baton Rough were brought to Tacoma to produce the "pigs". (PMC Annual Report for 1948)


Permanente Metals Corp. (Tacoma)--Employees; Guards--Tacoma--1940-1950; Private police--Tacoma--1940-1950; Gates--Tacoma--1940-1950; Factories--Tacoma--1940-1950; Aluminum industry--Tacoma--1940-1950;

D29327-5

Shiploading aluminum ingots at Shaffer Terminal #3, Permanente Metals, Pat Love. 4,000 metric tons (8,818,000 pounds) of aluminum, made into "pigs" by Permanente Metals Corporation in Spokane sits in one of the warehouses at Shaffer Terminals, ready to be loaded into an Argentine government freighter, the Palamar. This shipment represents the largest single shipment made by the Kaiser organization to date. As large as it is, this load will only fill one-half of the holds in the ship. (T.Times, 8/28/1947, p.1)


Permanente Metals Corp. (Tacoma); Aluminum industry--Tacoma--1940-1950; Shipping--Tacoma--1940-1950; Shaffer Terminals, Inc. (Tacoma); Loading docks--Tacoma--1940-1950;

D10847-6

Atlas Foundry, interior. Pouring of metal is pictured on February 12, 1941.


Atlas Foundry & Machine Co. (Tacoma); Foundries--Tacoma--1940-1950; Founding--Tacoma;

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