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Indians, Nisqually - 12

Sid Mills and an unidentified tribal member fishing on the Nisqually River despite laws preventing fishing. Both tribal members were arrested after they dropped a net and sped upstream.


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Indians, Nisqually
Photograph by Jerry Buck

Indians, Nisqually - 14

Catherine Frank, left, stands beside husband James V. Mills. Frank is a Nisqually tribal member and Mills is a Yakima tribal member. Also pictured: mother, blanket keeper, left, and food basket keeper at right.


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Indians, Nisqually

Indians, Nisqually - 16

Nisqually law enforcement officers, Jack Jewart, left, and Clyde Parsons, check over their new patrol boat at the Steilacoom Marina. The boat will be used for tribal fisheries regulation enforcement on Puget Sound.


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Indians, Nisqually

Indians, Nisqually - 17

Steve Wilson, left, and Nisqually leader George Kalama inspect gravel channel created for rearing fish on the Nisqually River to supplement fish that are produced naturally.


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Indians, Nisqually

Indians, Nisqually - 18

Sid Mills and an unidentified tribal member fishing on the Nisqually River. Both were arrested after they dropped a net and sped upstream.


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Indians, Nisqually
Photograph by Jerry Buck

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 1

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Indians, Puyallup


Confrontation between Puyallup tribal members and police about fishing rights guaranteed in the Medicine Creek Treaty (1854) resulted in a riot police unit being brought in to disperse the fishing camp. Shots were fired and tear gas was used. Photo taken by Tribune staff member Warren Anderson.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 2

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Indians, Puyallup


A Native American girl was arrested along with forty other indigenous people during a second confrontation with police following a fire on a railroad bridge near a Puyallup Tribal fishing camp. The fire started after police and state officers raided the fishing camp earlier that morning, arresting twenty people. Police later returned to the camp with fire units and arrested everyone at the fishing camp. The camp was established by Puyallup tribal members to advocate for fishing rights and indigenous people from across the United States joined their protest. Picture taken by Tribune staff member Wayne Zimmerman.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 3

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Indians, Puyallup


Confrontation between Puyallup tribal members and police about fishing rights guaranteed in the Medicine Creek Treaty (1854) resulted in a riot police unit being brought in to disperse the fishing camp. Shots were fired and tear gas was used. Two officers stand behind a truck as people look on in the background, including a person filming using a movie camera. Photo taken by Tribune staff member Warren Anderson.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 4

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Indians, Puyallup


U.S. District Court Judge Walter T. McGovern signed a temporary injunction citing a federal statute that prohibits liquor sales on tribal lands unless under a tribal liquor code. Judge McGovern stated that because the Puyallup Tribe does not have a liquor code it was illegal to sell liquor there. Some establishments continued to sell alcohol throughout the day. The image is of the Indian Trading Post located on Puyallup Tribal land and owned by Robert Satiacum and Victoria Satiacum.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 6

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Three-year-old Calvin Medina, Tacoma, checks out his competition and other tribal dress during the Puyallup tribe's Pow Wow. There was singing, dancing, eating, and competition for best dress and dance.
Photo by David Brandt

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 7

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Artist rendering of Puyallup Tribal Bingo Hall


A year after the Puyallup Tribe reached a $162 million settlement which guaranteed hundreds of new jobs, social services, and economic rebirth programs began to receive funding. “Among the tribe’s projects for economic improvement is a $2.1 million state-of-the-art bingo hall, seating up to 1,500 people, to be built in east Tacoma.” The bingo hall was estimated to generate between 90 to 150 jobs.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 9

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Indians, Puyallup


Employees of the Puyallup tribe’s fish hatchery released young trout into a tributary of the Puyallup river leading the trout to the Puget Sound and eventually the Pacific Ocean. The trout were around a year old and had been raised by the Puyallup Tribe at the tribal hatchery on Pioneer Way West. The Puyallup Tribe obtained the trout from the Quinault Tribe and the fish are the Quinault River steelhead. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

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