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Bennett, Ramona (Puyallup) - 10

Front of Photo:
Ramona Bennett shown with her daughter, Ee-Nuck-A-Mee, 7, is best known for her years of activism as Chairwomen of the Puyallup Tribe in Tacoma, Wash. Today, Ms. Bennett is Director of Family Services at the Seattle Indian Center where her job involves finding Indian foster homes for homeless Indian children.

Staff photo by Bruce Kellman

D2-032

Back of Photo

Norwegians in Costume, May 17, 1914, celebration and 100th anniversary of Norwegian constitutional assembly. At Eidsvold.

Dixon, Thomas (Activist) - 9

Back of Photo:
Tom Dixon, president of the Tacoma Urban League speaks to the media. The Rev. J.A. Boles sits beyond. These men delivered a statement to the press after conferring with other Black community leaders at St. John Baptist Church. The subject is police procedures and the shooting of a Black purse snatching suspect.
Staff photo by Peter Haley

Elder Pham and Elder Wetzer

Photo description from Vanna Sing:

When taken: 1980s and 2000s
Where taken: Eastside, Salishan
What memory is contained in these photos? Vanna Sing's childhood in Salishan and Eastside; Growing up in Salishan, spiritual healing. 43 year old survivor from the country of Cambodia. Roots are from SE Asia, Cambodia, Thai, and Laos. Our family escaped the Khmer Rouge in 1978 In July 1979, we entered United States. Our sponsors were from Mineral Wells, Texas. Trying to adapt to the American culture was a struggle. Through the word of mouth, Tacoma, Washington was the place to be. 15 families migrated to Tacoma, WA. We first arrived in Hilltop, Tacoma, around St. Joseph hospital area. We spent a year here. Tacoma Housing Authority supported refugees by providing rental assistance. Department of Social and Healthy Services gave us TANF, food stamp, and medical.


Back of Photo: Elder Pham and Elder Wetzer + Chamman (sp?) and Sarath and Paula and you Vanna; Love Paula Bear Paul Prom

Growing up in Salishan

Photo description from Vanna Sing:

When taken: 1980s and 2000s
Where taken: Eastside, Salishan
What memory is contained in these photos? Vanna Sing's childhood in Salishan and Eastside; Growing up in Salishan, spiritual healing. 43 year old survivor from the country of Cambodia. Roots are from SE Asia, Cambodia, Thai, and Laos. Our family escaped the Khmer Rouge in 1978 In July 1979, we entered United States. Our sponsors were from Mineral Wells, Texas. Trying to adapt to the American culture was a struggle. Through the word of mouth, Tacoma, Washington was the place to be. 15 families migrated to Tacoma, WA. We first arrived in Hilltop, Tacoma, around St. Joseph hospital area. We spent a year here. Tacoma Housing Authority supported refugees by providing rental assistance. Department of Social and Healthy Services gave us TANF, food stamp, and medical.

HBS-006

On October 22, 1945, this group of unidentified individuals were photographed seated around a table after what appears to be a dinner at the USO #2, 713-15 Commerce St. (photograph by F.L. Powell of Tacoma)

HBS-028

This undated photograph was taken in front of the snack bar at the USO No. 2 in Tacoma. At the head of the table was Arthur Hayes and at the end closest to the camera was Helen B. Stafford, local civic activist. USO No. 2 opened at 713 Commerce Street in September 1942 to serve Tacoma's African American servicemen and closed in March 1947. This location also served servicemen during World War I as the Army-Navy Club.

HBS-031

Undated photograph of the Matrons Club. The woman seated front left is Helen Beck Stafford, one of the founders of the group. Dr. Stafford moved to Tacoma in 1926 to marry Wendell P. Stafford on New Years Eve. Even though she had taught for a few years in Kansas schools, Tacoma school personnel directors refused to hire a black teacher. She stayed at home and cared for her husband and daughter. She and several other women who stayed home to rear their children would get together for a social outlet. In 1927, they formally organized the Matrons Club. The women who attended the meetings often brought their children along and the children would play together. (TNT 2/22/1982- NWR clipping file) (photograph by Liberal Engraving Co., 907 1/2 Commerce)

Lister Elementary Grade 1, 2002

Photo description from Vanna Sing:

When taken: 1980s and 2000s
Where taken: Eastside, Salishan
What memory is contained in these photos? Lister Elementary was a generational school. My first grade teacher was my daughter's first grade teacher.
Vanna Sing's childhood in Salishan and Eastside; Growing up in Salishan, spiritual healing. 43 year old survivor from the country of Cambodia. Roots are from SE Asia, Cambodia, Thai, and Laos. Our family escaped the Khmer Rouge in 1978 In July 1979, we entered United States. Our sponsors were from Mineral Wells, Texas. Trying to adapt to the American culture was a struggle. Through the word of mouth, Tacoma, Washington was the place to be. 15 families migrated to Tacoma, WA. We first arrived in Hilltop, Tacoma, around St. Joseph hospital area. We spent a year here. Tacoma Housing Authority supported refugees by providing rental assistance. Department of Social and Healthy Services gave us TANF, food stamp, and medical.

Members of Puyallup Tribe playing game on shores of Puget Sound

In this photograph believed to be from the mid 1880s, a group of Puyallup Indians gathers on the shore of the Puget Sound to gamble. The game they are playing appears to be the bone game, where two teams of 10-12 sit opposite each other. One team has four bones which they pass to the distracting accompaniment of the pounding of sticks and singing of chants. The other team must guess who has the bones. In the background are longboats and a bridge. The Puyallup village during this time period was believed to be at the foot of South 15th St. KING-003, TPL 2897.

RSO-40

Back of Photo:
Marching forward, arm in arm with their fellow young Americans are girls of the Tacoma and Puyallup valley JACL, a substantial part of the national Nisei soldiers and white boys of the same companies, at the wind-up of the grand march as they danced in Tacoma's Odd Fellows Hall. Americans all -- and no doubt of it -- were the young people in the throng pictured. the cameraman caught them as they closed the grand march Wednesday night at the Odd Fellows hall where Tacoma and Puyallup Valley American-born Japanese entertained their fellow "Nisei" who are serving in Uncle Sam's army. Both Nisei boys and soldiers of other complexions mixed enthusiastically at dinner, and the dance which followed it were equally popular with girls of the Japanese American Citizens League. Tacoma and Valley chapters of the JACL, aided by their parents, demonstrated their hospitality to the boys at Camp Murray and Fort Lewis as their part in the city's national defense week.


Overhead Shot of the members of the Puyallup Valley Japanese Americans Club arm in arms with Caucasian soldiers in an auditorium as the Brad Banner band plays on stage.

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