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Indians, Puyallup (General) - 2

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Indians, Puyallup


A Native American girl was arrested along with forty other indigenous people during a second confrontation with police following a fire on a railroad bridge near a Puyallup Tribal fishing camp. The fire started after police and state officers raided the fishing camp earlier that morning, arresting twenty people. Police later returned to the camp with fire units and arrested everyone at the fishing camp. The camp was established by Puyallup tribal members to advocate for fishing rights and indigenous people from across the United States joined their protest. Picture taken by Tribune staff member Wayne Zimmerman.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 22

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Nets Salmon


Puyallup Tribal member Mike Turnipseed fished near the Burlington Northern Railroad bridge in defiance of a court order and warnings of arrest by Game and Fisheries department officers. Superior Court Judge Charles T. Wright modified a temporary restraining order preventing Game and Fisheries department officers from making arrests or seizing gill nets. Wright’s actions limited fishing to Frank’s Landing on the Nisqually and only allowed two Native Americans to fish there: Suzette Bridges Mills and William Frank Jr.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 38

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News/ Puyallup Women Protest Spouse Fishing Ruling
Angry Puyallup Tribe women gathered at the Tribal administration building to protest a new rule disallowing spouses fishing rights. From left, Laura Rivera, Ramona Bennet, Deanna Val Peterson, and Betsy Terrones (holding kids Joaquin 1, and Richard, 2 months). After meeting with the group of women the rule was dropped and the spouse fishing right was restored.
Photo by Dean J. Koepfler

Bennett, Ramona (Puyallup) - 10

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Ramona Bennett shown with her daughter, Ee-Nuck-A-Mee, 7, is best known for her years of activism as Chairwomen of the Puyallup Tribe in Tacoma, Wash. Today, Ms. Bennett is Director of Family Services at the Seattle Indian Center where her job involves finding Indian foster homes for homeless Indian children.

Staff photo by Bruce Kellman

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 3

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Indians, Puyallup


Confrontation between Puyallup tribal members and police about fishing rights guaranteed in the Medicine Creek Treaty (1854) resulted in a riot police unit being brought in to disperse the fishing camp. Shots were fired and tear gas was used. Two officers stand behind a truck as people look on in the background, including a person filming using a movie camera. Photo taken by Tribune staff member Warren Anderson.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 9

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Indians, Puyallup


Employees of the Puyallup tribe’s fish hatchery released young trout into a tributary of the Puyallup river leading the trout to the Puget Sound and eventually the Pacific Ocean. The trout were around a year old and had been raised by the Puyallup Tribe at the tribal hatchery on Pioneer Way West. The Puyallup Tribe obtained the trout from the Quinault Tribe and the fish are the Quinault River steelhead. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 11

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Indians, Puyallup
Photo by Bob Rudsit


Police and state revenue agents seized cartons of unstamped cigarettes and other Tabacco products allegedly headed for the Satiacum Smoke Shop. The raid was based on a state law prohibiting unlicensed distributors from handling unstamped cigarettes. Puyallup Tribal member Robert Satiacum was not a licensed dealer according to Robert Munzinger, who served as assistant director of field operations for the Revenue Department. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 12

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Indians, Puyallup


Joe Washington, shaman of the Lummis, led the Puyallup Tribe in a ceremony marking the start of the salmon run. The ancient ceremony was held on tribal land near the Portland Avenue Bridge. The ceremony ended with a wedding. Joe Washington asked for the tribe’s adults to remember what they had seen and to pass the knowledge on to their children. Photo by Tribune staff member Russ Carmack.

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 13

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Indians, Puyallup


“Members of the Puyallup Tribe celebrate Yekabotsa Mills’ ninth birthday with a Native American Church prayer ceremony.” A tepee is backlit, showing the people sitting inside. Photo by New Tribune staff Dean J Koepfler

Indians, Puyallup (General) - 20

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Indians, Puyallup


Employees of the Puyallup tribe’s fish hatchery released young trout into a tributary of the Puyallup river leading the trout to the Puget Sound and eventually the Pacific Ocean. The trout were around a year old and had been raised by the Puyallup Tribe at the tribal hatchery on Pioneer Way West. The Puyallup Tribe obtained the trout from the Quinault Tribe and the fish are the Quinault River steelhead. Photo by Tribune staff member Bob Rudsit.

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